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Cnemidophorus ruthveni BURT, 1935

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Higher TaxaTeiidae, Teiinae, Gymnophthalmoidea, Sauria, Squamata (lizards) 
Subspecies 
Common Names 
SynonymCnemidophorus murinus ruthveni BURT 1935: 1
Cnemidophorus murinus ruthveni — HUMMELINCK 1940: 85
Cnemidophorus murinus ruthveni — MASLIN & SECOY 1986
Cnemidophorus ruthveni — UGUETO & HARVEY 2010
Cnemidophorus ruthveni — HARVEY et al. 2012 
DistributionBonaire

Type locality: Seroe Grandi, Bonaire  
Reproduction 
TypesHolotype: UMMZ 57270, an adult female 
DiagnosisDiagnosis. A species of the genus Cnemidophorus distinguished from all congeners by the following combination of characters: (1) maximum SVL in males 151 mm (Lammere ́e, 1970); (2) nostril usually slightly anterior to nasal suture; (3) rostral scale bluntly rounded; (4) frontonasal usually hexagonal or octagonal, forming slightly angular sutures with nasals; (5) first supraciliary usually separated from prefrontal; (6) scales of circumorbital semicir- cles 9–12 (total of both sides) in contact with supraoculars, extending to posterior or middle portion of third supraocular; (7) 51–96 (total of both sides) scales in doubled or tripled rows between supraoculars and supraciliaries; (8) mesoptychials barely enlarged; (9) ventrals in 10–12 longitudinal and 35–40 transverse rows; (10) bisexual (gonochoristic); (11) brachials barely enlarged and restricted to small patch near elbow; (12) males with one anal spur on each side; spur broad and short, extending very close to body; (13) 2–3 medium scales between anal spur and preanal shield; (14) subcaudals near base of tail smooth; (15) stripes absent in juveniles, but dark dorsolat- eral fields often indicated on rump; (16) adult males in life with dark gray head with white or pale blue spots and brown or tan body with 12–19 large white or pale blue spots on flanks; (17) females in life uniformly gray-brown with indication of pale lateral longitudinal stripes or 0–15 faint large spots on flanks; (18) juvenile color pattern like that of adult females [from UGUETO & HARVEY 2010]. 
Comment 
Etymology 
References
  • Beolens, Bo; Michael Watkins, and Michael Grayson 2011. The Eponym Dictionary of Reptiles. Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, USA - get paper here
  • Burt, C. E. 1931. A study of the teiid lizards of the genus Cnemidophorus with special reference to their phylogenetic relationships. Bull. US Natl. Mus. 154: 286 pp. - get paper here
  • Burt, Charles E. 1935. A new lizard from the Dutch Leeward Islands (Cnemidophorus murinus ruthveni). Occasional Papers of the Museum of Zoology, University of Michigan (324): 1-3 - get paper here
  • HARVEY, MICHAEL B.; GABRIEL N. UGUETO & RONALD L. GUTBERLET, Jr. 2012. Review of Teiid Morphology with a Revised Taxonomy and Phylogeny of the Teiidae (Lepidosauria: Squamata). Zootaxa 3459: 1–156 - get paper here
  • Hummelinck, P. W. 1940. Studies on the fauna of Curacao, Aruba, Bonaire and the Venezuelan Islands: No. 2. A survey of the mammals, lizards and mollusks. ['Gymnophthalmus laevicaudus: 80]. Studies on the Fauna of Curacao and other Caribbean Islands. 1:59—108
  • Maslin, T. & Secoy, D.M. 1986. A checklist of the lizard genus Cnemidophorus (Teiidae). Contr. Zool. Univ. Colorado Mus. 1: 1-60
 
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