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Hydrophis cantoris GÜNTHER, 1864

IUCN Red List - Hydrophis cantoris - Data Deficient, DD

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Higher TaxaElapidae (Hydrophiinae), Colubroidea, Alethinophidia, Serpentes, Squamata (snakes) 
Subspecies 
Common NamesE: Cantor’s narrow –headed sea snake
Farsi: Mâr-e daryâï-ye gunder 
SynonymHydrophis cantoris GÜNTHER 1864: 374
Hydrophis cantoris — ANDERSON 1871: 193
Distira gillespiae BOULENGER 1899: 642
Distira gillespiae — WALL 1905: 310
Microcephalophis cantoris — WALL 1921: 330
Microcephalophis cantoris — SMITH 1943: 475
Microcephalophis cantoris — CORKILL & COCHRANE 1966
Hydrophis cantoris — WELCH 1994: 67
Microcephalophis cantoris — DAS 1996: 61
Hydrophis cantoris — LEVITON et al. 2003
Hydrophis (Microcephalophis) cantoris — KHARIN 2004
Hydrophis cantoris — DAVID et al. 2004
Microcephalophis cantoris — WALLACH et al. 2014: 439
Microcephalophis cantoris — REZAIE-ATAGHOLIPOUR et al. 2016: 157 
DistributionIndian Ocean (Pakistan, India, Myanmar (= Burma), Thailand, Malaysia), Andaman Islands, Iran (Gulf of Oman)

Type locality: Penang, Malaysia Map legend:
TDWG region - Region according to the TDWG standard, not a precise distribution map.

NOTE: TDWG regions are generated automatically from the text in the distribution field and not in every cases it works well. We are working on it.
 
Reproductionviviparous 
TypesHolotype: BMNH 1946.1.18.30 
CommentVenomous!

Distribution: Not listed by GRANDISON 1977 for West Malaysia or Singapore.

DIAGNOSIS. Head small, body long and slender anteriorly; scales on thickest part of body juxtaposed; 5–6 maxillary teeth behind fangs; 23–25 (rarely 21) scale rows around neck, 41–48 around thickest part of body (increase from neck to midbody 18–24); ventrals divided by a longitudinal fissure; prefrontal in contact with third upper labial; ventrals 404–468. Total length males 1450 mm, females 1880 mm; tail length males 120 mm, females140 mm. [after LEVITON 2003; see also REZAIE-ATAGHOLIPOUR et al. 2016: 158]

The original description is available online (see link below).

Habitat: marine. 
References
  • Aengals, R.; V.M. Sathish Kumar & Muhamed Jafer Palot 2013. Updated Checklist of Indian Reptiles.
  • Anderson, J. 1871. On some Indian reptiles. Proc. Zool. Soc. London 1871: 149-211 - get paper here
  • Chan-ard, T., Parr, J.W.K. & Nabhitabhata, J. 2015. A field guide to the reptiles of Thailand. Oxford University Press, NY, 352 pp. [see book reviews by Pauwels & Grismer 2015 and Hikida 2015 for corrections] - get paper here
  • Corkill, N. L. and Cochrane, J. A. 1966. The snakes of the Arabian Peninsula and Socotra. J. Bombay nat. Hist. Soc. 62 (3): 475-506 (1965) - get paper here
  • DAVID, Patrick; MEREL J. COX, OLIVIER S. G. PAUWELS, LAWAN CHANHOME AND KUMTHORN THIRAKHUPT 2004. Book Review - When a bookreview is not sufficient to say all: an in-depth analysis of a recent book on the snakes of Thailand, with an updated checklist of the snakes of the Kingdom. The Natural History Journal of Chulalongkorn University 4(1): 47-80 - get paper here
  • Günther, A. 1864. The Reptiles of British India. London (Taylor & Francis), xxvii + 452 pp. - get paper here
  • Kharin, V.E. 2004. A review of sea snakes of the genus Hydrophis sensu stricto (Serpentes, Hydrophiidae). [in Russian]. Biologiya Morya (Vladivostok) 30 (6): 447-454
  • Kharin, V.E. 2004. Review of Sea Snakes of the genus Hydrophis sensu stricto (Serpentes: Hydrophiidae). Russian Journal of Marine Biology 30 (6): 387-394
  • Leviton, Alan E.; Guinevere O.U. Wogan; Michelle S. Koo; George R. Zug; Rhonda S. Lucas and Jens V. Vindum 2003. The Dangerously Venomous Snakes of Myanmar Illustrated Checklist with Keys. Proc. Cal. Acad. Sci. 54 (24): 407–462
  • Rezaie-Atagholipour M, Ghezellou P, Hesni MA, Dakhteh SMH, Ahmadian H, Vidal N 2016. Sea snakes (Elapidae, Hydrophiinae) in their westernmost extent: an updated and illustrated checklist and key to the species in the Persian Gulf and Gulf of Oman. ZooKeys 622: 129–164, doi: 10.3897/zookeys.622.9939
  • Sharma, R. C. 2004. Handbook Indian Snakes. AKHIL BOOKS, New Delhi, 292 pp.
  • Smith, M.A. 1943. The Fauna of British India, Ceylon and Burma, Including the Whole of the Indo-Chinese Sub-Region. Reptilia and Amphibia. 3 (Serpentes). Taylor and Francis, London. 583 pp.
  • Wall, F. 1905. Notes on Snakes collected in Cannanore from 5th November 1903 to 5th August 1904. J. Bombay Nat. Hist. Soc. 16: 292 - get paper here
  • Wall, F. 1918. Notes on a Collection of Sea Snakes from Madras. J. Bombay Nat. Hist. Soc. 25: 599-607 - get paper here
  • Wall, FRANK 1921. Ophidia Taprobanica or the Snakes of Ceylon. Colombo Mus. (H. R. Cottle, govt. printer), Colombo. xxii, 581 pages - get paper here
  • Wallach, Van; Kenneth L. Williams , Jeff Boundy 2014. Snakes of the World: A Catalogue of Living and Extinct Species. Taylor and Francis, CRC Press, 1237 pp.
 
External links  
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As link to this species use URL address:

http://reptile-database.reptarium.cz/species?genus=Hydrophis&species=cantoris

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