You are here » home advanced search search results Tropidurus azurduyae

Tropidurus azurduyae CARVALHO, RIVAS, CÉSPEDES & RODRIGUES, 2018

Can you confirm these amateur observations of Tropidurus azurduyae?

Add your own observation of
Tropidurus azurduyae »

We have no photos, try to find some by Google images search: Google images

Higher TaxaTropiduridae, Iguania, Sauria, Squamata (lizards) 
Subspecies 
Common Names 
SynonymTropidurus azurduyae CARVALHO, RIVAS, CÉSPEDES & RODRIGUES 2018 
DistributionBolivia (Chuquisaca, Cochabamba, Potosí, Santa Cruz), elevation 1040 - 2764 m

Type locality: Parque Nacional Torotoro, Potosí, Bolivia (18° 5’ 54.24’’ S, 65° 44’ 57.48’’ W — WGS84 system; ~2264 m elevation  
Reproduction 
TypesHolotype: MHNC-R 3011 (Museo Cochabamba, Bolivia), adult male, collected by A.L.G. Carvalho, M.A. Sena, L.R. Rivas, G. Juchazara, E. Lujo, and F. Mamani in 13 November 2013. Allotype: MHNC-R 3009, adult female, same locality as holotype (18° 5′ 53.88′′ S, 65° 44′ 57.12′′ W — WGS84 system; ~2262 m), collected by A.L.G. Carvalho, M.A. Sena, L.R. Rivas, G. Juchazara, E. Lujo, and F. Mamani in 13 November 2013. Paratypes: MHNC-R 3007, adult female, same locality as holotype (18° 6′ 15.48′′ S, 65° 45′ 36.00′′ W — WGS84 system; ~2569), collected by A.L.G. Carvalho, M.A. Sena, L.R. Rivas, J. Choque, J. Kamaqui, and E. Lujo in 14 November 2013. MHNC-R 3008, adult female, same locality (18° 6′ 25.56′′ S, 65° 45′ 27.36′′ W — WGS84 system; ~2579 m), collected by A.L.G. Carvalho, M.A. Sena, L.R. Rivas, J. Choque, J. Kamaqui, and E. Lujo in 14 November 2013. MHNC-R 3010, adult male, same locality (18° 5′ 52.32′′ S, 65° 44′ 57.48′′ W — WGS84 system; ~2269 m), collected by A.L.G. Carvalho, M.A. Sena, L.R. Rivas, G. Juchazara, E. Lujo, and F. Mamani in 13 November 2013. MHNC-R 3012, adult male, same locality (18° 6′ 25.56′′ S, 65° 45′ 25.92′′ W — WGS84 system; ~2566 m), collected by A.L.G. Carvalho, M.A. Sena, L.R. Rivas, J. Choque, J. Kamaqui, and E. Lujo in 14 November 2013. MHNC-R 3015, adult male, same locality (18° 6′ 25.92′′ S, 65° 45′ 25.92′′ W — WGS84 system; ~2562 m), collected by A.L.G. Carvalho, M.A. Sena, L.R. Rivas, J. Choque, J. Kamaqui, and E. Lujo in 14 November 2013. MHNC-R 3016, adult male, same locality (18° 5′ 54.24′′ S, 65° 44′ 55.32′′ W — WGS84 system; ~2556 m), collected by A.L.G. Carvalho, M.A. Sena, L.R. Rivas, G. Juchazara, E. Lujo, and F. Mamani in 13 November 2013. MHNC-R 3017, adult male, same locality (18° 5′ 55.32′′ S, 65° 44′ 58.56′′ W — WGS84 system; ~2274 m), collected by A.L.G. Carvalho, M.A. Sena, L.R. Rivas, G. Juchazara, E. Lujo, and F. Mamani in 13 November 2013. MHNC-R 3020, adult male, same locality (18° 5′ 11.88′′ S, 65° 45′ 44.28′′ W — WGS84 system; ~2596 m), collected by A.L.G. Carvalho, M.A. Sena, L.R. Rivas, J. Choque, J. Kamaqui, and E. Lujo in 14 November 2013. MHNC-R 3024, juvenile female, same locality (18° 5′ 55.32′′ S, 65° 44′ 57.48′′ W — WGS84 system; ~2269 m), collected by A.L.G. Carvalho, M.A. Sena, L.R. Rivas, G. Juchazara, E. Lujo, and F. Mamani in 13 November 2013. MHNC-R 3026, juvenile female, same locality (18° 5′ 54.24′′ S, 65° 44′ 55.32′′ W — WGS84 system; ~2256 m), collected by A.L.G. Carvalho, M.A. Sena, L.R. Rivas, G. Juchazara, E. Lujo, and F. Mamani in 13 November 2013. 
DiagnosisDiagnosis: Tropidurus azurduyae is here morphologically diagnosed as a Tropidurus based on the observation of a set of characters suggested by Frost et al. (2001) as exclusive to the genus: skull not highly elevated at the level of the orbits; “ ash” marks on underside of thighs present; circumorbitals distinct from other small supraorbital scales; lateral fringe not developed on both sides of fourth toes; enlarged middorsal scale row absent; tail terete; and hemipenis attenuate without apical disks. e presence of a maxilla not broad, nutri- tive foramina of maxilla strikingly enlarged, lingual process of dentary extending over lingual dentary process of coronoid, angular strongly reduced, and absence of medial centrale could not be examined without dissecting or clearing and staining specimens. ese characters should be revised whenever larger series of individuals become available.
Tropidurus azurduyae is a member of the T. torquatus group per Frost et al. (2001). It dif- fers from other species groups by lacking an enlarged middorsal scale row (well marked in species of the T. spinulosus group, especially in males), by exhibiting black “ ash” marks on the underside of thighs and cloacal ap of adult males (yellow, cream, or orangey “ ash” marks are present in males of the T. spinulosus group), and also by lacking a dorsoventrally attened body (as observed in species of the T. semitaeniatus group and, more moderately, in T. bogerti).
Tropidurus azurduyae is the only species in the genus with lower anks pigmented orange, a condition consistently observed in both sexes ( g. 3E–H). Its ventral head is darkly pig- mented and o ers contrast to the light circular blotches present on chin and also laterally ( g. 3G, H). e ground color of its throat is charcoal gray impregnated with strong orange color- ation ( g. 3G, H). A pair of mite pockets is present on the lateral neck, with the posterior one larger; the anterior pocket originates lower than the posterior, but both usually end ventrally at the same level ( g. 3F). No pockets are found in the armpit and inguinal region of the new species. An elliptical or subrhomboidal black mark is present on the mid venter of adult males of T. azurduyae in addition to black “ ash” marks on the underside of thighs and precloacal ap ( g. 3H). Tropidurus azurduyae is saxicolous, but may climb tree trunks and fallen logs occasionally ( g. 1H). In combination, this set of characters provides a safe diagnosis, distin- guishing T. azurduyae from all other congeners.

Comparison with Other Species: Tropidurus azurduyae, T. cocorobensis, T. chromatops, T. etheridgei, T. hygomi, and T. psammonastes are the only species of the T. torquatus group that have two mite pockets on the lateral neck and lack di erentiated skin folds or pockets in the axillary and inguinal regions. Although T. catalanensis, T. imbituba, and T. torquatus also have two mite pockets on the lateral neck, all three species exhibit 2–3 shallow granular areas in the axillary region and a fully developed granular inguinal pocket. e two pockets on the lateral neck of T. azurduyae are not exceptionally broadened nor deep, and they di er from the extremely enlarged lateral neck pockets of T. chromatops ( g. 5). ey are also slightly distinct from the pockets of T. hygomi, which are oblique and deep, with the anterior one positioned more ventrally than the posterior one in both species. Tropidurus hygomi and T. azurduyae can be further distinguished by the presence of expanded scales covering the supraocular area of the former species. e anterior lateral neck pocket of T. azurduyae is coated with granular scales, while this same structure in T. psammonastes is coated with regular scales (only the posterior one is granular). For a more comprehensive summary of mite-pocket morphologies and their taxonomic distribution in the T. torquatus group, refer to Rodrigues (1987: gs. 1–13) and Carvalho et al. (2016: table 2, g. 8).
Tropidurus azurduyae is saxicolous, and its ecology contrasts markedly with the psammophi- lous habit of three other species of the T. torquatus group with two lateral neck mite pockets, T. cocorobensis, T. hygomi, and T. psammonastes. It can also be distinguished from T. cocorobensis and T. hygomi based on its larger body size (SVL: 66.06–104.85 mm in males and 62.83–89.58 mm in females of T. azurduyae, 61.39–74.59 mm in males and 60.27–65.37 mm in females of T. cocorobensis, and 54.15–67.30 mm in males and 48.08–60.38 mm in females of T. hygomi). e new species also lacks the 2–4 well-marked black ocellar spots that decorate the upper anks of T. cocorobensis anteriorly, from nuchal collar, just above the humerus, reaching to the middle of the body. Tropidurus azurduyae di ers from T. chromatops in terms of coloration by lacking an intense burnt-red dorsal head and a facial mask with touches of blue and cream ( gs. 5, 6A–D). e new species exhibits a champagne background, mottled with dark grayish-brown and lead pigmentation, and dark ventral head. is coloration is fairly distinct from the dirty-yellow dorsal background decorated with a brown reticulated pattern, and light ventral head ornate with a loose reticulum or semireticulum, found in T. etheridgei (pattern better marked in males than females; g. 3A–D). Moreover, with regard to coloration, the lower anks and gular region pigmented in orange in both sexes is, to our knowledge, exclusive to T. azurduyae. 
CommentDistribution: See Carvalho et al. 2018: 32 (Fig. 12) for a map. 
EtymologyThe species name azurduyae is a noun in the feminine genitive case honoring Juana Azurduy de Padilla (Chuquisaca, Bolivia: July 12, 1780–May 25, 1862), one of the most distinguished Latin American leaders who bravely fought for the independence of the Spanish territory of Upper Peru, which comprised part of today’s Bolivia and Peru, and formed along with Argentina, Uruguay, and Paraguay the Viceroyalty of the Río de La Plata during colonial times. Her memory remained nearly forgotten for more than a century, until President Cristina Kirchner conferred on her the title of General of the Argentinian Army in 2009, and in that same year, the Bolivian Senate promoted Juana Azurduy posthumously to the rank of Marshal of the Republic, declaring her “Liberator of Bolivia.” Although the biography of Juana Azurduy assuredly places her as one of the most important women of Latin America, the history of her ght for freedom and equality has not received enough attention outside history classes and political events. Naming Tropidurus azurduyae we do not aim to merely reverence her as a historical personage and revolutionary soldier, but to genuinely honor her intelligence, courage, and heroic actions against a male-dominated colonialist world whose roots remain alive at the present time. is is an a rmative action to remind all Latin American women and men of our female heritage of strength and combativeness. 
References
  • Carvalho, André L.G.; Luis Rolando Rivas, Ricardo Céspedes, and Miguel T. Rodrigues 2018. A New Collared Lizard (Tropidurus: Tropiduridae) Endemic to the Western Bolivian Andes and Its Implications for Seasonally Dry Tropical Forests. American Museum Novitates (3896): 1-56. - get paper here
 
External links  
Is it interesting? Share with others:

As link to this species use URL address:

http://reptile-database.reptarium.cz/species?genus=Tropidurus&species=azurduyae

without field 'search_param'. Field 'search_param' is used for browsing search result.



Please submit feedback about this entry to the curator