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Tympanocryptis osbornei MELVILLE, CHAPLIN, HUTCHINSON, SUMNER, GRUBER, MACDONALD & SARRE, 2019

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Higher TaxaAgamidae (Amphibolurinae), Sauria, Iguania, Squamata (lizards) 
Subspecies 
Common NamesMonaro Grassland Earless Dragon 
SynonymTympanocryptis osbornei MELVILLE, CHAPLIN, HUTCHINSON, SUMNER, GRUBER, MACDONALD & SARRE 2019 
DistributionAustralia (New South Wales)

Type locality: Cooma, NSW (see types).  
Reproduction 
TypesHolotype. SAMA R43098, Cooma, NSW. Adult male. [specific location details held in SAMA database but not released for publication due to conservation concerns].
Paratypes. NMV D76106, NMV D76105 Cooma, NSW. SAMA R43347, Cooma, NSW. AM R38172, R131836, Cooma, NSW. 
DiagnosisDiagnosis. A species of Tympanocryptis with tapering snout, nasal scale below the canthus rostralis, six or seven dark dorsal crossbands, lateral skin fold, dorsal tubercles terminating in a prominent spine directed posterodorsally, lacking tubercular scales on the thighs, smooth gular scales, frequent presence of dark speckling on the ventral surfaces, especially the throat, and with 12 or more caudal blotches.

Comparison to other species. Tympanocryptis osbornei, with a distribution restricted to grasslands on the Monaro tablelands, is geographically isolated and does not overlap with any other Tympanocryptis species. See T. lineata for comments on separating these two species. 
CommentHabitat. Naturally treeless native grassland communities from 758 to 1234 m above sea level on basalt geology and heavy clay soils and in predominately dry tussock grasslands of snow grasses (Poa spp.), wallaby grasses (Austrodanthonia spp.) and kangaroo grass (Themeda triandra) [54]. The species overwinters in crevices or burrows excavated by wolf spiders beneath surface rocks [12] but its ecology has been little studied. 
EtymologyNamed for Dr Will Osborne, conservation biologist and ecologist, who provided the first accounts of this species in the modern era and has spearheaded ecological and conservation research. 
References
  • Melville J, Chaplin K, Hutchinson M, Sumner J, Gruber B, MacDonald AJ, Sarre SD. 2019. Taxonomy and conservation of grassland earless dragons: new species and an assessment of the first possible extinction of a reptile on mainland Australia. R. Soc. open sci. 6: 190233 - get paper here
 
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