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Anolis aridius KÖHLER, ZIMMER, MCGRATH & HEDGES, 2019

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Higher TaxaDactyloidae, Iguania, Sauria, Squamata (lizards) 
Subspecies 
Common Names 
SynonymAudantia aridius KÖHLER, ZIMMER, MCGRATH & HEDGES 2019: 72
Audantia aridius — KWET 2020 
DistributionDominican Republic (E Barahona Peninsula)

Type locality: near Cortico (18.11163, -71.22293), 1340 m, Province Barahona, Dominican Republic  
Reproduction 
TypesHolotype. SMF 97896, an adult male; collected 31 October 2013 by Gunther Köhler. Field tag number GK-4823.
Paratypes. All from Barahona Province, Dominican Republic: SMF 97895, Barahona, Hotel Costa Larimar (18.199622; -71.086953), 10 m, collected 29 October 2013 by Gunther Köhler; SMF 97892–94, Los Lirios (18.11345; -71.2617), 1110 m, collected 29 October 2013 by Gunther Köhler; MNHNSD 23.3620, near Polo (18.1135; -71.26964), 855 m, collected 31 October 2013 by Gunther Köhler; SMF 104162-63, 2.9 miles NW La Ciénaga (18.07022; -71.12332), 355 m, collected 30 July 1999 by locals; USNM 329093 11.3 km S Barahona (measured from Hotel Caribe) (18.1172;-71.0717), 20 m, collected 20 August 1984 by S. Blair Hedges and Richard Thomas; USNM 329090-92, 20.8 km S Cabral (18.0964; -71.2819), 975 m, collected 19 August 1984 by S. Blair Hedges and Richard Thomas; USNM 329089, ca. 6–7 km NW Paraíso (18.0274; -71.1920), 180 m, collected 13 August 1983 by S. Blair Hedges. All paratypes are adult males except MNHNSD 23.3620 and USNM 329090 which are adult females, and USNM 329089 and 329093 in which the sex was not determined. 
DiagnosisDiagnosis. A species of the genus Audantia (our Species 4 “aridius”) that differs from all congeners by the combination of having (1) smooth ventral scales; (2) male dewlap dirty white with yellowish or orange suffusions, and with homogeneously distributed gorgetal scales, reduced in size in central portion of dewlap; (3) no dark gular streaks in males; (4) no patch of enlarged scales in nuchal region; (5) a double row of greatly enlarged, at least three times the size of adjacent scales, non-mucronate vertebral scales; (6) usually two to three sublabial scale in contact with infralabials; (7) 186–234 scales around midbody in males; and (8) keeled scales on dorsal surfaces of upper forelimb and anterior surface of thigh.

Audantia aridius differs from A. armouri by having one or two well-defined pale longitudinal lateral stripes, usually edged with orange or olive-green (vs. such stripes absent); by having widley spaced gorgetals (vs. moderately spaced gorgetals); by having a double row of greatly enlarged vertebral scales, at least three times the size of adjacent scales (vs. those scales only weakly enlarged, usually less than twice the size of adjacent scales); and by having 184–234 scales around midbody in males (vs. 118–172).
Audantia aridius differs from A. breslini and A. shrevei by having smooth ventral scales (vs. usually keeled); by having dark gular streaks (usually absent); by having one or two well-defined pale longitudinal lateral stripes, usually edged with orange or olive-green (vs. such stripes absent); and by having a double row of greatly enlarged vertebral scales, at least three times the size of adjacent scales (vs. those scales only weakly enlarged, usually less than twice the size of adjacent scales). Audantia aridius differs further from A. shrevei by lacking a patch of greatly enlarged scales in nuchal region (vs. such a patch present). Audantia aridius differs from A. cybotes by having smooth ventral scales (vs. keeled, some individuals of A. cybotes with smooth ventrals); by lacking dark gular streaks on male dewlap (vs. those present); by having yellowish or orange suffusions (vs. absent); by having widely spaced gorgetals and scales reduced in size in central portion of dewlap (vs. all scales narrowly spaced and large on posterior half of dewlap); and by having non-mucronate vertebral scales (vs. mucronate). Audantia aridius differs from A. doris and A. hispaniolae by having homogeneously distributed gorgetals (vs. heterogeneously distributed with groups of cluttered scales). Audantia aridius differs further from A. doris by having one or two well-defined pale longitudinal lateral stripes, usually edged with orange or olive-green (vs. such stripes absent); by having yellowish or orange suffusions on male dewlap (vs. no suffusions, but with an orange blotch in center of dewlap); by having 186–234 scales around midbody in males (vs. 166–184); and by having non-mucronate vertebral scales (vs. mucronate). Audantia aridius differs further from A. hispaniolae by lacking dark gular streaks (vs. present). Audantia aridius differs from A. marcanoi and A. strahmi by having a dirty white male dewlap with yellowish or orange suffusions (vs. rose-red at the edge, more orangish anteriorly and posteriorly, but purplish or even bluish toward the center in A. marcanoi, and orange with paler center in A. strahmi). Audantia aridius differs further from A. marcanoi by having a well-defined double row of enlarged vertebral scales (vs. vertebral scales gradually enlarged, not forming a regular double row). Audantia aridius differs from A. longitibialis by having a male dewlap with homogeneously distributed gorgetal scales, that are smaller in central region of dewlap (vs. heterogeneously distributed with groups of cluttered scales, all gorgetals small); and by having yellowish or orange suffusions (vs. absent). Audantia aridius differs from A. ravifaux by having keeled scales on dorsal surface of upper forelimb and anterior surface of thigh (vs. smooth); by having homogeneously distributed gorgetals (vs. heterogeneously distributed with groups of cluttered scales); by having a double row of greatly enlarged vertebral scales, at least three times the size of adjacent scales (vs. those scales only weakly enlarged, usually less than twice the size of adjacent scales); and by having one or two well-defined pale longitudinal lateral stripes, usually edged with orange or olive-green (vs. such stripes absent). Audantia aridius differs from A. saxatilis by having smooth ventral scales (vs. keeled); by having yellowish or orange suffusions (vs. absent); and by having a male dewlap with gorgetal scales, that are smaller in central region of dewlap (vs. all gorgetals small). Audantia aridius differs from A. australis and A. higuey by having widely spaced gorgetals, so more skin is more uncovered than covered by gorgetals (vs. upper portion of dewlap mostly covered by gorgetals with little free skin). Audantia aridius differs further from A. australis by lacking dark gular streaks (vs. present); and by having a double row of greatly enlarged, at least three times the size of adjacent scales, vertebral scales (vs. weakly enlarged, usually less than twice the size of adjacent scales). For differences between A. aridius and the species described below, see the respective accounts of the new species. 
CommentSynonymy: previously called A. cybotes. See chresonymy in KÖHLER et al. 2019: 72. 
EtymologyThe species name (aridius) is a noun in apposition derived from the Latin adjective aridus (“dry”), in allusion to the arid habitats where this species occurs. 
References
  • Köhler, Gunther; Caroline Zimmer, Kathleen McGrath, and S. Blair Hedges 2019. A REVISION OF THE GENUS AUDANTIA OF HISPANIOLA WITH DESCRIPTION OF FOUR NEW SPECIES (REPTILIA: SQUAMATA: DACTYLOIDAE). NOVITATES CARIBAEA 14: 1-104 - get paper here
  • Kwet, A. 2020. Liste der im Jahr 2019 neubeschriebenen Reptilien. Elaphe 2020 (3): 44-67
 
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