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Eutropis madaraszi (MÉHELY, 1897)

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Higher TaxaScincidae, Mabuyinae, Scincoidea, Sauria, Squamata (lizards) 
Subspecies 
Common NamesE: Sri Lanka Bronze Skink 
SynonymMabuia madaraszi MÉHELY 1897
Mabuya madaraszi — DAS 1996
Eutropis madaraszi — ZIESMANN et al. 2007
Eutropis madaraszi — DAS et al. 2008
Eutropis madaraszi — SOMAWEERA & SOMAWEERA 2009 
DistributionSri Lanka

Type locality: Ceylon. Two of the syntypes were from "Kala-Wewa" (08° 01'N; 80° 31'E, North Central Province, Sri Lanka) and "Madatugama" (07° 57'N; 80° 38'E, North Central Province, Sri Lanka).  
Reproduction 
TypesNeotype. WHT 7001, male, 68.0 mm SVL, Kalahagala near Polonnaruwa, 07°52’N, 80°54’E, 60 m elevation, 5 June 2003, collected and designated by S. Batuwita 2016.
Syntypes: MNH (Musei Nacionalis Hungarici), destroyed in a fire in 1956 (Balázs Farkas, in litt., June 5, 1996). 
DiagnosisDiagnosis. Maximum SVL 70.0 mm; supranasals widely separated; prefrontals widely separated; postnasals absent; second supraocular in contact with frontal; frontoparietals paired, as long as wide; parietal eye present; parietals completely separated by interparietal; nuchals one pair; supraciliaries five, third distinctly elongate; pretemporals two, either only the upper in contact or both in contact with parietal; primary temporal 1 or 2; secondary temporals two, separated by a tertiary temporal; supralabials seven; postsupralabial one; lower eyelid scaly; infralabials seven; first pair of chin shields in contact medially; dorsal and lateral body scale carination extends up to nuchals; paravertebrals 37–42; ventrals 48–59; longitudinal scale rows at midbody 28–31; keels on dorsal and lateral body scales 3–7; subdigital lamellae under fourth digit of pes 15–19; all digits with well developed median keels; dorsal coloration copper-brown with 6–8 series of dark brown longitudinal lines, and skin not fragile (Batuwita 2016).

Comparisons. “Here I compare E. madaraszi to congeners from Asia, listing only opposing suites of character states. Eutropis andamanensis: six supraciliaries, primary temporal single, sub- digital lamellae under fourth digit of pes 29; E. austini: only upper pretemporal contact with parietal, two postsupralabials, lacking well-developed median keels under subdigital lamellae; E. beddomei: prefrontals in contact medially, six supraciliaries; E. bibronii: lower eyelid with a transparent window, 20–22 subdigital lamellae under fourth digit of pes; E. carinata: supraciliaries 6–7; maximum SVL 122.0 mm, first pair of chin shields separated by a single median scale; E. clivicola: prefrontals in contact medially, first pair of chin shields separated by a single median scale; E. dissimilis: supranasals in contact medially, prefrontals in contact medially, lower eyelid with a transparent window; E. floweri: first pair of chin shields separated by a single median scale, dorsum with a paired series of transverse black markings; E. gansi: postsupralabials two, first pair of chin shields separated by a median scale; E. greeri: postsupralabials two, skin fragile, paravertebral scales 31–34, body dorsum bronze brown; E. innotata: lower eyelid with a transparent window, six supra- ciliaries; E. longicaudata: supranasals in contact medially, postna- sal present; E. macularia: first pair of chin shields separated by a median scale, subdigital lamellae lacking median keels; E. multifasciata: prefrontals in contact medially, postnasal present; E. nagarjuni: two pairs of nuchals, prefrontals in contact medially; E. novemcarinata: supranasals in contact medially, lower eyelid with a transparent window; E. quadricarinata: prefrontals in contact medially, postnasal present; E. tammanna: prefrontals in contact medially, dorsolateral stripe absent, SVL up to 54.0 mm; E. rugifera: 22–27 subdigital lamellae under fourth digit of pes; E. trivittata: supranasals in contact medially, prefrontals in contact medially; E. tytleri: prefrontals in contact medially, postnasal present.” (Batuwita 2016). 
CommentSimilar species: E. floweri

Illustrations: The photographed individuals (fig. 256A, G) labeled as E. macularia macularia by Somaweera and Somaweera (2009) are E. madaraszi.

Sympatry: E. tammanna (at Polonnaruwa and Tissamaharama), E. carinata and L. fallax (at Kurunegala and Allauwa), E. flweri (in Mundel).

Habitat: Eutropis madaraszi is a semiarboreal lizard, frequently observed on rock surfaces and on tree buttresses.

Synonymy: This species has been previously synonymized with E. macularia but removed from synonymy by Da Silva (1998; fide I. DAS, pers. comm.). 
EtymologyMabuia madaraszi was named after Julius v. Madarász, also known as Gyula Madarasz (1858-1931) of the MNH. 
References
  • Batuwita, Sudesh 2015. Description of Two New Species of Eutropis (Reptilia: Scincidae) from Sri Lanka with a Redescription of Eutropis madaraszi (Méhely) Journal of Herpetology Sep 2016, Vol. 50, No. 3: 486-496. - get paper here
  • Das, Indraneil; de Silva, Anslem; Austin, Christopher C. 2008. A new species of Eutropis (Squamata: Scincidae) from Sri Lanka. Zootaxa 1700: 35-52 - get paper here
  • Das,I. 1996. Biogeography of the Reptiles of South Asia. Krieger Publishing Company, Malabar, Florida
  • Datta-Roy, Aniruddha; Mewa Singh, C. Srinivasulu, K. Praveen Karanth 2012. Phylogeny of the Asian Eutropis (Squamata: Scincidae) reveals an ‘into India’ endemic Indian radiation. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 63: 817–824 - get paper here
  • Karunarathna, D. M. S. S. and A. A. T. Amarasinghe 2012. Reptile diversity in Beraliya Mukalana proposed forest reserve, Galle District - Sri Lanka. Taprobanica 4 (1): 20-26 - get paper here
  • Méhely, L. 1897. Zur Herpetologie von Ceylon. Termes Fuzetek, Budapest, xx: 55-70
  • RODRIGO, R.K.; U.K.G.K. PADMALAL, C.N.B. BAMBARADENIYA, V.A.M.P.K SAMARAWICKRAMA, N. PERERA, M.S.J. PERERA, T.N. PERIES 2006. COMPARISON OF HERPETOFAUNAL DIVERSITY IN THREE WETLAND IN HABITATS THE SOUTH-EAST COAST OF SRI LANKA. Wildlanka 1 (1): - get paper here
  • Somaweera, R. & Somaweera, N. 2009. Lizards of Sri Lanka: a colour guide with field keys. Chimaira, Frankfurt, 304 pp.
  • Ziesmann, S.; Klaas, P.& Janzen, P. 2007. Von Skinken und anderen Echsen [Sri Lankas]. Draco 7 (30): 18-23 - get paper here
 
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