You are here » home advanced search search results Liolaemus janequeoae

Liolaemus janequeoae TRONCOSO-PALACIOS, DIAZ, PUAS & RIVEROS-RIFFO & ELORZA, 2016

Can you confirm these amateur observations of Liolaemus janequeoae?

Add your own observation of
Liolaemus janequeoae »

We have no photos, try to find some by Google images search: Google images

Higher TaxaLiolaemidae, Iguania, Sauria, Squamata (lizards) 
Subspecies 
Common NamesE: Janequeo’s Lizard
S: Lagarto de Janequeo 
SynonymLiolaemus janequeoae TRONCOSO-PALACIOS, DIAZ, PUAS & RIVEROS-RIFFO & ELORZA 2016 
DistributionChile (Araucanía)

Type locality: Laguna Verde (38°12'S - 71°44'W, elevation 1397 m), approximately 13.5 km NW of the summit of the Tolhuaca Volcano, Araucanía Region, Chile Map legend:
Type locality - Type locality.
 
ReproductionVivparous. 
TypesHolotype. SSUC Re 712 (Fig. 4). Male. Collected by J. Troncoso-Palacios and Edvin Riveros-Riffo. January 15, 2016.
Paratypes. SSUC Re 713–14. Two females (Fig. 4). Same data as the holotype. SSUC Re 715. Female. Collected at the locality of the holotype by Edvin Riveros- Riffo. February 18, 2015. SSUC Re 649–51, three females. Collected at the locality of the holotype by J. Troncoso-Palacios, F. Urra and H. Díaz. January 5, 2014 (Fig. 4). 
CommentDiagnosis. Liolaemus janequeoae belongs to the L. elongatus clade. This species is characterized by 1) small size (maximum snout vent length = 69.6 mm), 2) lack of dorsal pattern, 3) high number of midbody scales (82–98), 4) precloacal pores present in males, and 5) absence of dark rings on the tail. We provide a differential diagnosis with regards to all species currently considered to be members of this clade, plus L. scorialis Troncoso-Palacios Díaz, Esquerré & Urra, 2015, the assignment of which is under study, but probably is related to the L. elongatus clade (Troncoso-Palacios et al. 2015). Table 1 summarizes some of the diagnostic traits. Based on seven specimens.
Liolaemus janequeoae is closely related to L. elongatus. However, L. janequeoae is smaller (maximum SVL = 69.6 mm, n = 7 adults, vs. max. SVL = 94.7 mm) and has more midbody scales (82–98 vs. 68–87) than L. elongatus from Argentina (Table 1). Dorsal color pattern in L. elongatus is highly variable from vertebral and lateral dark bands to complete melanism, whereas L. janequeoae never has black spots (only small black dots in one female). Interestingly, SVL of L. cf. elongatus from Llaima, Chile (SVL = 68.4 ± 2.9 mm), is not significantly different compared with the SVL of L. janequeoae (SVL = 65.3 ± 3.4 mm); but head height is lower in L. janequeoae than in L. cf. elongatus (6.8 ± 0.5 mm vs 8.3 ± 0.7 mm) (t = -4.6, DF = 11, P < 0.01); the head is wider in L. cf. elongatus than in L. janequeoae (12.7 ± 0.9 mm vs 11.0 ± 0.4 mm) (Mann–Whitney U = 0.001, P < 0.01); L. janequeoae has more midbody scales than L. cf. elongatus (82–98 vs. 76–88) (t = 3.0, DF = 11, P < 0.05), more dorsal scales (77–89 vs. 67–73) (t = 7.7, DF = 11, P < 0.01) and more ventral scales (124–132 vs. 119–129) (t = 2.5, DF = 11, P < 0.05). Additionally, PCA results show that L. janequeoae and L. cf. elongatus from Llaima occupy a different region of morphological space, without overlap (Fig. 3). Liolaemus janequeoae is smaller (SVL = 65.3 ± 3.4 mm) than L. antumalguen (SVL = 95.0 ± 6.2 mm) (t = -11.3, DF = 14, P < 0.01); has a shorter axilla-groin distance (27.8 ± 2.9 mm vs 43.0 ± 4.4 mm) (Mann–Whitney U, P < 0.01); a shorter arm length (24.7 ± 2.3 mm vs 28.4 ± 0.7 mm) (t = -4.5, DF = 14, P < 0.01); a lower head height (6.8 ± 0.5 mm vs 10.0 ± 0.6 mm) (t = -11.2, DF = 14, P < 0.01); a narrower head (11.0 ± 0.4 mm vs 16.6 ± 0.8 mm) (t = -17.2, DF = 14, P < 0.01); and has shorter foot length (19.4 ± 1.4 mm vs 28.5 ± 1.2 mm) (Mann–Whitney U, P < 0.01); whereas L. janequeoae has more midbody scales than L. antumalguen (t = 6.2, DF = 14, P < 0.01, Table 1), more dorsal scales (t = 7.6, DF = 14, P < 0.01, Table 1) and more ventral scales (t = 8.2, DF = 14, P < 0.01, Table 1). Moreover, L. antumalguen has a very variable dorsal pattern of black spots to almost complete melanism, whereas L. janequeoae never has black spots (only small black dots in one female). Additionally, PCA results show that both species occupy a different region of morphological space, without overlap (Fig. 3).
Liolaemus carlosgarini, L. scorialis and L. lonquimayensis have dark lateral and ver- tebral bands, features that distinguishes these from L. janequeoae. Additionally, L. janequeoae is larger than L. carlosgarini (SVL = 65.3 ± 3.4 mm vs SVL = 60.2 ± 5.1 mm) (t = 2.4, DF = 22, P < 0.05); L. janequeoae has a larger axilla-groin length than L. carlosgarini (27.8 ± 2.9 mm vs 24.8 ± 2.9 mm) (t = 2.3, DF = 22, P < 0.05); L. janequeoae has longer arms than L. carlosgarini (24.7 ± 2.3 mm vs 21.8 ± 1.8 mm) (t = 3.4, DF = 22, P < 0.01); L. janequeoae has more dorsal scales than L. carlosgarini (t = 4.5, DF = 14, P < 0.01, Table 1) and more ventral scales (t = 6.8, DF = 14, P < 0.01, Table 1); whereas L. lonquimayensis has larger axilla-groin length (34.9 ± 1.7 mm) than L. janequeoae (Mann–Whitney U, P < 0.05); L. lonquimayensis has a greater head height than L. janequeoae (8.3 ± 0.1 mm vs 6.8 ± 0.5 mm) (t = -4.8, DF = 8, P < 0.01); whereas L. scorialis has the head wider than L. janequeoae (11.9 ± 0.6 mm vs 11.0 ± 0.4 mm) (t = -3.1, DF = 16, P < 0.01); L. janequeoae has more midbody scales than L. scorialis (t = 3.6, DF = 16, P < 0.01, Table 1) and more dorsal scales (t = 4.8, DF = 17, P < 0.01, Table 1). Additionally, PCA results show that L. janequeoae does not overlap in the morphological space with L. carlosgarini and L. scorialis when ellipses are gener- ated with the second and third PCs (Fig. 3).
Liolaemus janequeoae is smaller (max. SVL = 69.6 mm) than L. shitan (max. SVL = 98.3 mm) and has more midbody scales (82–98 vs. 72–85). Dorsal color pattern in L. shitan is black, whereas only one female of our sample of L. janequeoae has small dorsal black dots.
Liolaemus janequeoae is smaller (max. SVL = 69.6 mm) than L. choique (max. SVL = 90.7 mm). Moreover, L. choique has a very variable dorsal pattern of black spots to almost complete melanism, whereas L. janequeoae never has black spots (only small black dots in one female).
Liolaemus janequeoae is smaller than L. crandalli (max. SVL = 69.6 mm vs max. SVL = 93.4 mm). Moreover, L. crandalli has dark lateral and vertebral bands with ringed tail, whereas all of these features are completely absent in L. janequeoae. Ac- cording to Avila et al. (2015), L. crandalli is the sister taxon of the pair L. smaug + L. choique, whereas in our phylogeny L. janequeoae is not closely related to L. smaug or L. choique.
Liolaemus janequeoae is smaller than L. burmeisteri (max. SVL = 69.6 mm vs max. SVL = 85.2 mm) and has more midbody (82–98 vs. 70–81) and ventral scales (124– 132 vs. 99–110). Moreover, L. burmeisteri has dark lateral bands.
Liolaemus janequeoae has more midbody scales than L. smaug (82–98 vs 73–80). Moreover, L. smaug has dark lateral and vertebral band. In our phylogeny L. janeque- oae and L. smaug are not sister taxa (Troncoso-Palacios et al. 2015). 
EtymologyThis species is named after Janequeo, a prominent Lonko (tribal chief) of Mapuche-Pehuenche origins. She fought against colonial Spaniards in the Arauco war, carried out mainly in the Araucanía Region where Liolaemus janequeoae was dis- covered. It is believed that she became involved in the war after her partner (Lonko Hueputan) was captured and tortured to death. She played a leading role in the Battle of Fort Puchunqui, then retreating to Villarrica, where she disappeared. 
References
  • Troncoso-Palacios J, Diaz HA, Puas GI, Riveros-Riffo E, Elorza AA 2016. Two new Liolaemus lizards from the Andean highlands of Southern Chile (Squamata, Iguania, Liolaemidae). ZooKeys 632: 121-146 - get paper here
 
External links  
Is it interesting? Share with others:

As link to this species use URL address:

http://reptile-database.reptarium.cz/species?genus=Liolaemus&species=janequeoae

without field 'search_param'. Field 'search_param' is used for browsing search result.



Please submit feedback about this entry to the curator