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Marisora aurulae HEDGES & CONN, 2012

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Higher TaxaScincidae, Mabuyinae, Scincoidea, Sauria, Squamata (lizards) 
Subspecies 
Common NamesLesser Windward Skink 
SynonymMarisora aurulae HEDGES & CONN 2012: 122
Mabuia agilis — BOULENGER 1887:191 (part)
Mabuia aenea — GARMAN 1887:53 (part)
Mabuya aenea — BARBOUR 1914:322 (part)
Mabuya aenea — BARBOUR 1930:105 (part)
Mabuya mabouia — BARBOUR 1935:129 (part)
Mabuya mabouya mabouya — DUNN 1936:544 (part)
Mabuya mabouia — BARBOUR 1937:147 (part)
Mabuya aenea — UNDERWOOD 1963:83 (part)
Mabuya mabouya mabouya — PETERS & DONOSO-BARROS 1970:200 (part)
Mabuya mabouya mabouya — SCHWARTZ & THOMAS 1975:141 (part)
Mabuya mabouya mabouya — MACLEAN et al. 1977:40–41 (part)
Mabuya mabouya mabouya — SCHWARTZ & HENDERSON 1988:150 (part)
Mabuya mabouya mabouya — SCHWARTZ & HENDERSON 1991:457 (part)
Mabuya bistriata — POWELL et al. 1996:82 (part)
Mabuya sloanii — MAYER & LAZELL 2000:883 (part)
Mabuya mabouya — MIRALLES 2005:49 (part?)
Mabuya falconensis — MIRALLES et al. 2009:609 (part)
Mabuya mabouya — HENDERSON & POWELL 2009:292 (part) 
DistributionSt. Vincent (Young's Island), Tobago

Type locality: Young's Island, St. Vincent  
Reproduction 
TypesHolotype: MCZ R-38196, an adult female from Young's Island, St. Vincent, collected 11 November 1934 by J. B. Myers.
Paratypes (n = 12). Grenada. MCZ R-79743, James Lazell, Glover Island, 21 June 1964; USNM 72658–59, Belmont, St. George (no collection date available). Grenadines. KU 242049, Albert Schwartz, Saline Bay, Mayreau (Mayero) Island, 13 December 1961; KU 242050, Albert Schwartz, Petit Bateau, Tobago Cays, 13 December 1961; MCZ R-79098, C. MacIntosh, Carriacou, 1963. Tobago. KU 242012, Albert Schwartz, 1 mile E Canaan (13 May 1963); MCZ R-12079–80, W. E. Broadway (no specific locality or collection date available); MCZ R-55668, Garth Underwood, Scarborough, 5 September 1956. Trinidad. MCZ R-100482–83, J. Boos, La Romain, 14 June 1967. 
DiagnosisDiagnosis. Marisora aurulae sp. nov. is characterized by (1) maximum SVL in males, 80.9 mm; (2) maximum SVL in females, 89.0 mm; (3) snout width, 2.47–3.08% SVL; (4) head length, 16.7–19.1% SVL; (5) head width, 13.0–15.0% SVL; (6) ear length, 1.00–2.13% SVL; (7) toe-IV length, 7.96–10.5% SVL; (8) prefrontals, two; (9) supraoculars, four; (10) supraciliaries, four (85%), five (15%); (11) frontoparietals, two; (12) supralabial below the eye, five (69%), six (31%); (13) nuchal rows, one; (14) dorsals, 57–63; (15) ventrals, 57–68; (16) dorsals + ventrals, 114–129; (17) midbody scale rows, 30–32; (18) finger-IV lamellae, 11–15; (19) toe-IV lamellae, 14–17; (20) finger-IV + toe-IV lamellae, 26–32; (21) supranasal contact, Y (46%), N (54%); (22) prefrontal contact, N; (23) supraocular-1/frontal contact, N; (24) parietal contact, Y; (25) pale middorsal stripe, N; (26) dark dorsolateral stripe, N; (27) dark lateral stripe, Y; (28) pale lateral stripe, Y; and (29) palms and soles, dark (Tables 3–5).

Marisora aurulae sp. nov. differs from M. alliacea, M. magnacornae sp. nov., and M. unimarginata in having shorter limbs (arm + leg length 53.7–55.9% SVL versus 55.7–69.1% SVL; Fig. 49). From M. unimarginata and M. magnacornae sp. nov. it also differs in having 2–4 pairs of chin shields in contact with the infralabials versus one pair in M. magnacornae sp. nov. and usually one pair (88%) in M. unimarginata. From M. magnacornae sp. nov. it also differs in having shorter toes (toe-IV length 7.96–10.5% SVL versus 12.4% in M. magnacornae sp. nov.). Marisora aurulae sp. nov. is separated from M. roatanae sp. nov. in having a longer supraciliary-1 scale (1.65–1.77% SVL versus 1.04–1.29% in M. roatanae sp. nov.; Fig. 50A). From M. falconensis, its closest relative (Figs. 5–7), M. aurulae sp. nov. differs in having shorter toes (toe-IV length 7.96–10.5% SVL versus 10.8–11.9% in M. falconensis; Fig. 50B). Also, most M. aurulae sp. nov. that we examined (82%) have dark palms and soles and we score that as the fixed state in the species, assuming that the coloration has faded in the remaining 18%. However, M. falconensis is considered to have pale palms and soles (Miralles et al. 2005a), and thus this may be another diagnostic difference. In body pattern, M. aurulae sp. nov. differs from all other species in the genus, including M. falconensis, in being paler and in having the standard stripe pattern weakly defined or nearly absent (Figs. 47A, and 48). From M. alliacea it further differs in lacking dark dorsolateral stripes (present in M. alliacea). 1.77% SVL versus 1.04–1.29% in M. roatanae sp. nov.; Fig. 50A). From M. falconensis, its closest relative (Figs. 5–7), M. aurulae sp. nov. differs in having shorter toes (toe-IV length 7.96–10.5% SVL versus 10.8–11.9% in M. falconensis; Fig. 50B). Also, most M. aurulae sp. nov. that we examined (82%) have dark palms and soles and we score that as the fixed state in the species, assuming that the coloration has faded in the remaining 18%. However, M. falconensis is considered to have pale palms and soles (Miralles et al. 2005a), and thus this may be another diagnostic difference. In body pattern, M. aurulae sp. nov. differs from all other species in the genus, including M. falconensis, in being paler and in having the standard stripe pattern weakly defined or nearly absent (Figs. 47A, and 48). From M. alliacea it further differs in lacking dark dorsolateral stripes (present in M. alliacea) [HEDGES & CONN 2012 ]. 
CommentSynonymy: HEDGES & CONN 2012.

Sympatric species: Copeoglossum aurae 
EtymologyThe species name (aurulae) is a feminine genitive singular noun, from the Latin noun aurula (small wind, breeze) alluding to both its smaller size (compared with sympatric Copeoglossum aurae sp. nov.) and its distribution on the Windward Islands: the southern Lesser Antilles, sometimes including Trinidad and Tobago (see Etymology of C. aurae sp. nov. for further comments on the term "windward"). The first part of the common name (Lesser Windward Skink) refers to the smaller body size of this species, compared with C. aurae sp. nov. (Greater Windward Skink), described above. 
References
  • Hedges, S.B. & Conn, C.E. 2012. A new skink fauna from Caribbean islands (Squamata, Mabuyidae, Mabuyinae). Zootaxa 3288: 1–244 - get paper here
 
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