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Naja anchietae BOCAGE, 1879

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Higher TaxaElapidae, Serpentes (snakes) 
Subspecies 
Common NamesAnchieta's Cobra 
SynonymNaja anchietae BOCAGE 1879
Naja haje BOETTGER 1887: 164 (not Linnaeus)
Naia anchietae BOULENGER 1896: 387
Naja haje anchietae — MERTENS 1937
Naja haje anchietae — BOGERT 1943
Naja haje anchietae — AUERBACH 1987: 197
Naja haje anchietae — SPAWLS & BRANCH 1995
Naja annulifera anchietae — BROADLEY 1995: 31
Naja anchietae — BROADLEY & WÜSTER 2004
Naja (Uraeus) anchietae — WALLACH et al. 2009
Uraeus anchietae — WALLACH et al. 2014: 762 
DistributionS Angola, W Zambia, N Namibia, N Botswana, NW Zimbabwe,

Type locality: Caconda, Angola. Map legend:
TDWG region - Region according to the TDWG standard, not a precise distribution map.

NOTE: TDWG regions are generated automatically from the text in the distribution field and not in every cases it works well. We are working on it.
 
TypesLectotype MBL 1987 (destroyed according to BROADLEY & WÜSTER 2004) 
CommentVenomous!

Distribution: after BROADLEY & WÜSTER (2004). Previous reports also included Mozambique, Malawi, Swaziland, S Democratic Republic of the Congo (Zaire).

Colouration.— Juveniles are yellow above and below, dorsally with dark scale margins forming irregular transverse lines and a broad black band encircling the neck. Adults gradually darken to light or dark brown, the dark band on the neck fades out. The venter is usually yellow, heavily blotched with dark brown, and the throat band, covering ca. ventrals 12-23, becomes purple-brown.

A banded phase sometimes occurs in the southern part of the species range, black with six to eight yellow bands on the body and one to three on the tail. The light bands are usually as wide or wider than the dark ones. This banded phase
has been noted in 13% of males and 22% of females.

Size.—Largest male (NMWN 9734 - Windhoek, Namibia) 1990 + 320 = 2310 mm; largest female (NMZB-UM 31521 - 25 km S of Shakawe, Botswana) 1870 + 310 = 2180 mm.

Reproduction: oviparous. 
EtymologyNamed after José de Anchieta (9 Oct 1832 -14 Sep 1897), Portugese explorer of Africa. 
References
  • Auerbach,R.D. 1987. The Amphibians and Reptiles of Botswana. Mokwepa Consultants, Botswana, 295 pp.
  • Beolens, Bo; Michael Watkins, and Michael Grayson 2011. The Eponym Dictionary of Reptiles. Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, USA
  • Bocage,J.V.B. du 1879. Reptiles et batraciens nouveaux d'Angola. J. Acad. Sci. Lisbon 7: 97-99
  • Boettger,O. 1887. Zweiter Beitrag zur Herpetologie Südwest- und Südafrikas. Ber. senckenb. naturf. Ges., Frankfurt am Main, 1887:135-173 - get paper here
  • Bogert, Charles M. 1943. Dentitional phenomena in cobras and other elapids with notes on adaptive modifications of fangs. Bull. Amer. Mus. Nat. Hist. 81 (3): 285-260
  • Boulenger, G.A. 1896. Catalogue of the snakes in the British Museum, Vol. 3. London (Taylor & Francis), xiv + 727 pp. - get paper here
  • Broadley, D.G. 1959. The herpetology of Southern Rhodesia. Part I--the snakes. Bull. Mus. Comp. Zool. Harvard 120 (1): 1-100 [reprint 1972] - get paper here
  • Broadley, D.G. 1968. A review of the African cobras of the genus Naja (Serpentes: Elapinae). Arnoldia (Rhodesia) (ser. 3) 29: 1-14
  • Broadley, D.G. 1995. The snouted cobra, Naja annulifera, a valid species in southern Africa. J. Herpetol. Ass. Africa 44: 26-32. - get paper here
  • BROADLEY, D.G. & W. WÜSTER 2004. A review of the southern African ‘non-spitting’ cobras (Serpentes: Elapidae: Naja). African Journal of Herpetology 53 (2):101-122 - get paper here
  • Broadley, D.G.; Doria, C.T. & Wigge, J. 2003. Snakes of Zambia. An Atlas and Field Guide. Edition Chimaira, Frankfurt, 280 pp. [review in Sauria 26 (3): 21]
  • Broadley, Donald G. and F. P. D. Cotterill. 2004. The reptiles of southeast Katanga, an overlooked 'hot spot'. [Congo]. African Journal of Herpetology 53 (1): 35-61. - get paper here
  • Broadley,D.G. 1962. On some reptile collections from the North-Western and North-Eastern Districts of Southern Rhodesia 1958-1961, with descriptions of four new lizards. Occ. Pap. Nat. Mus. South. Rhodesia 26 (B): 787-843
  • Cimatti, E. 2007. Namibia - Introduction to a vast territory. Reptilia (GB) (50): 58-67 - get paper here
  • Dobiey, M. & Vogel, G. 2007. Venomous Snakes of Africa/Giftschlangen Afrikas. Terralog 15, Edition Chimaira, Frankfurt am Main, 150 pp.
  • Herrmann, H.-W.; W.R. Branch 2013. Fifty years of herpetological research in the Namib Desert and Namibia with an updated and annotated species checklist. Journal of Arid Environments 93: 94–115 - get paper here
  • Mertens, R. 1937. Reptilien und Amphibien aus dem südlichen Inner-Afrika. Abh. senckenberg. naturf. Ges. 435: 1-23
  • Spawls, S., Branch,B. 1995. The Dangerous Snakes of Africa. Blandford, London, 192 pp.
  • Sternfeld, R. 1910. Zur Schlangenfauna Deutsch-Südwestafrikas. Mehrere Fälle von Mimikry bei afrikanischen Schlangen. Mitt. zool. Mus. Berlin, 5: 51-60 - get paper here
  • Trape, J.F.; Chirio, L.; Broadley, D.G. & Wüster, W. 2009. Phylogeography and systematic revision of the Egyptian cobra (Serpentes: Elapidae: Naja haje) species complex, with the description of a new species from West Africa. Zootaxa 2236: 1–25 - get paper here
  • Wallach, V.; Wüster, W. & Broadley, D.G. 2009. In praise of subgenera: taxonomic status of cobras of the genus Naja Laurenti (Serpentes: Elapidae). Zootaxa 2236: 26–36 - get paper here
  • Wallach, Van; Kenneth L. Williams , Jeff Boundy 2014. Snakes of the World: A Catalogue of Living and Extinct Species. Taylor and Francis, CRC Press, 1237 pp.
 
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